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a loss so vast. the aca is not just above the expansion of medicaid or establishing an insurance exchange, it is about the hundreds of federal mandates and procedural requirements that have the escaped public attention, but to which we by law must obey. the fine print of the legislation is so complex, even the federal government struggles to understand it. the states cannot fully understand the impact on finances, systems changes, and operations. this law completely overwhelms society's safety net for the needy. there are a few problems in pennsylvania created by the aca. the law mandates that we expand our provider enrollment system to check with their medicare data. medicare databases cannot handle automated changes. we will have to add staff resources to respond to 100,000 inquiries every month. we are mandated to create separate databases to accommodate is exchanges and some databases like the masterfile, we have not been given access to. we adopt past medicaid rules radically changing the tailor- made renewal system that took years to refine and perfect. the verification system will
that must be covered by any health plan offering a plan in the aca exchange. i understand this has far reaching consequences on premiums. benefits must be provided. according to the notice in the federal register, the rule was approved by administrator on august 1, 2012. that is three months before. yet the role did not receive approval from secretary sebillius until two weeks ago. what did it take two month for the administration staff to review -- and yet the public will have only four weeks to review during the period of public comment on the ruling issued on november 26? i would note this is a time of year when people's focus is generally on things other than long awaited rules. >> we put a bulletin on the essential health benefits quite some time ago and got comments on the bulletin. the public had an opportunity to provide public comment on essential health benefits before the proposed rule was put out. there were some changes from what had been in the bulletin, but by and large what is in the bulletin is what is a in the proposed rule. i think there has been ample opportunity fo
are trying to do that, implementing thea aca. i feel strongly of rewarding doctors differently, in a way that rewards success. in those discussions, are there other ways we can see revenues come in from within the health- care system? i think that is on the table. i am not keen on raising the age for medicare. we have to help figure out how to a group of people figure out how to get health college. that is the cost of subsidies. do they go into the exchange. for medicare, the use of the least expensive seniors we have, 65 and 66 year olds. the most expensive seniors are much older. you have to look at the consequences and whether that is a cost savings at the end of each day for government and for families. >> one final question on the immediate and we will go back to the broader agenda. the president had a firm statement this week about the test ceiling where he says, i will not play that game, meaning he will not negotiate for raising the debt ceiling. how was that going to work? does that need to be part of any agreement to appoint -- agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff? >> this is se
intermediate deficit problem and implementation of the cost saving measures strengthened over time in the aca will deal with their long-term health care problem. so we are not that far away and we have other tremendous strengths in our country that would allow us to make the kind of investment to transform the economy, to do with the reality of stagnant wages and a sense of diminished opportunities. we have strengths. we can do it. we need the public to rain and behavior that's destructive and we need political leaders to act forcefully. given enough to bipartisan commissions and searched enough for bipartisan consensus. for sensible hard all politics along these lines. >> norm, i particularly cutie take the money question. a couple political had a great shared that showed that party polarization in congress was directly correlated with increasing concentrations of wealth from increasing equality went together artisan polarization. and the money question you can handle so many different ways. i'm really concerned about it posed citizens united system with a federal election commission that's
. we are trying to do that. implementing the aca is important in terms of delivery reforms. it pays doctors differently. it rewards quality. we should do that sooner than later. save those dollars sooner. in those discussions, are there other ways that we can see revenues come in from within the health-care system? that is on the table. i am not keen on increasing the age on medicare. we have gone through a really big debate about finding a way to have all americans have health insurance. that is taking a group of americans and figure out how they afford health coverage. that shifts the costs of subsidies and they go into the exchange. does makes it more expensive for younger people because the older cohort is in that group? for medicare, these are the least expensive seniors we have. the most expensive seniors are much older. you have to look exactly at the consequences and whether that is cost savings for government and families? >> the president had a firm statement this week to the business roundtable about the debt ceiling where he said, i will not play that game. he will not n
at the internet and say do we have to draw lines here? have we gone too far? i personally think my position on a.c.a. is a good position and protecting the people's right to know is a high priority. >> what have you decided to do with all your papers and years in congress? >> that is an important question. i'm pleased to say that my alma mater at ucla is taking some interest. hopefully, some of that work will be of value to researchers sometime out there. >> you have expressed optimism and interest of what your future might hold but it has to be difficult leaving this institution after so many years. this has been most of your adult life, your way of life. how are you using these last few weeks here, still as a voting member of congress? is the experience -- does it feel different saying this might be the last time i will do this? >> i was looking at my cad and wondering how many more votes i have left. if i thought this was the end of impacting public affairs i would be very nostalgic. we're looking at it as another chapter in life -- the book of life that we look forward to. >> do you plan to make
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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